Making Nationalized Health Care MANDATORY…

I wanted to write tonight but I have found that perparing for my trip after a long day of work is proving more time consuming that I had intended. So rather than leaving you all with nothing, I decided that I would post the article that I was planning to write about this evening. Starting to see bills like this pop up really bothers me and worries me at the same time. It seems that the Senate has decided that not only will Congress plan on making national health care a reality, they will also work to make it a punishable crime to decide that you don’t want coverage at all. As I said, little time this evening so this is the article exactly as it appeared. I will try to find time while traveling tomorrow to jump in and add my thoughts.

Senate Bill Would Fine People More Than $1,000 for Refusing Health Care Coverage

Senate aides said the penalties, estimated to raise around $36 billion over 10 years, would be modeled on the approach taken by Massachusetts, which now imposes a fine of about $1,000 a year on individuals who refuse to get coverage.

WASHINGTON — Americans who refuse to buy affordable medical coverage could be hit with fines of more than $1,000 under a health care overhaul bill unveiled Thursday by key Senate Democrats looking to fulfill President Barack Obama’s top domestic priority.

The Congressional Budget Office estimated the fines will raise around $36 billion over 10 years. Senate aides said the penalties would be modeled on the approach taken by Massachusetts, which now imposes a fine of about $1,000 a year on individuals who refuse to get coverage. Under the federal legislation, families would pay higher penalties than individuals.

In a revamped health care system envisioned by lawmakers, people would be required to carry health insurance just like motorists must get auto coverage now. The government would provide subsidies for the poor and many middle-class families, but those who still refuse to sign up would face penalties.

Called “shared responsibility payments,” the fines would be set at least half the cost of basic medical coverage, according to the legislation. The goal is to nudge people to sign up for coverage when they are healthy, not wait until they get sick.

In 2008, employer-provided coverage averaged $12,680 a year for a family plan, and $4,704 for individual coverage, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation’s annual survey. Senate aides, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly, said the cost of the federal plan would be lower but declined to provide specifics.

The legislation would exempt certain hardship cases from fines. The fines would be collected through the income tax system.

The new proposals were released as Congress neared the end of a weeklong July 4 break, with lawmakers expected to quickly take up health care legislation when they return to Washington. With deepening divisions along partisan and ideological lines, the complex legislation faces an uncertain future.

Obama wants a bill this year that would provide coverage to the nearly 50 million Americans who lack it and reduce medical costs.

In a statement, Obama welcomed the legislation, saying it “reflects many of the principles I’ve laid out, such as reforms that will prohibit insurance companies from refusing coverage for people with pre-existing conditions and the concept of insurance exchanges where individuals can find affordable coverage if they lose their jobs, move or get sick.”

The Senate Health Education, Labor and Pensions bill also calls for a government-run insurance option to compete with private plans as well as a $750-per-worker annual fee on larger companies that do not offer coverage to employees.

Sens. Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass., and Christopher Dodd, D-Conn., said in a letter to colleagues that their revised plan would cost dramatically less than an earlier, incomplete proposal, and help show the way toward coverage for 97 percent of all Americans.

In a conference call with reporters, Dodd said the revised bill had brought “historic reform of health care” closer. He said the bill’s public option will bring coverage and benefit decisions driven “not by what generates the biggest profits, but by what works best for American families.”

The Congressional Budget Office, in an analysis released Thursday evening, put the net cost of the proposal at $597 billion over 10 years, down from $1 trillion two weeks ago. Coverage expansions worth $645 billion would be partly offset by savings of $48 billion, the estimate said.

However, the total cost of legislation will rise considerably once provisions are added to subsidize health insurance for the poor through Medicaid. Those additions, needed to ensure coverage for nearly all U.S. residents, are being handled by a separate panel, the Senate Finance Committee. Bipartisan talks on the Finance panel aim to hold the overall price tag to $1 trillion.

The Health Committee could complete its portion of the bill as soon as next week, and the presence of a government health insurance option virtually assures a party-line vote.

In the Senate, the Finance Committee version of the bill is unlikely to include a government-run insurance option. Bipartisan negotiations are centered on a proposal for a nonprofit insurance cooperative as a competitor to private companies.

Three committees are collaborating in the House on legislation expected to come to a vote by the end of July. That measure is certain to include a government-run insurance option.

At their heart, all the bills would require insurance companies to sell coverage to any applicant, without charging higher premiums for pre-existing medical conditions. The poor and some middle-class families would qualify for government subsidies to help with the cost of coverage. The government’s costs would be covered by a combination of higher taxes and cuts in projected Medicare and Medicaid spending.

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Comments

  1. ar_dennis51 says:

    This is one reason, this one Democrat, voted for McCain in 2008. Hell no!! NHo socialist medical coverage. Most people, like us can’t afford it.

    • Naten53 says:

      I tend not to talk politics with family, I think it is better to get along then argue about politics. But this weekend I did talk with family members that are republicans and democrats. The clear consensus was that we are not happy with what is going on at the State or Federal level. Democrat family members were talking about fearing a revolution if it continues. A lot of grim faces for a 4th of July picnic with beautiful weather.

      • Naten, these kinds of stories are very enlightening to me; that people are waking up and are concerned.

  2. Vinnster says:

    In the long run there is no way the Obama Administration can let National Health Care be voluntary. Remember Obama/Socialism garners its power by setting the poor/lower middle class against the upper middle class/rich. Under the guise of “fairness” the poor/lower middle class are convinced they have the right to take something they never earned from people who work extra hard and earn more than them.

    National Health Care will be no different, because National Heath care will be provided at an inferior quality compared to the private sector, so the private sector will have to go. If the Obama/Socialist do not force everyone onto the same low quality system there will be the National Health Care System of low quality for the poor/lower middle class and the Private Sector high quality system for the upper middle class/rich.

    This disparity is against the whole ideal of “Fairness/Socialism”. The mandatory requirement will again be sold (and voted for) in a setting of the poor/lower middle class against the upper middle class/rich.

    In the end the upper middle class/rich will go to other countries (a new cottage industry will be created to serve them) for the best care, that is, until that is outlawed by the Socialist too.

    • Well, “the One” did campaign on punishing the coal power industry. Why should we be surprised he feels punishing individuals is any different? Its all for our own good.
      Bend over, say “thank you sir, may I have another?”

      Its all about the power to control our lives.

      • LOI, I have a really big problem with people trying to control me, and it may be the one thing that causes my demise.

        G!

    • lindavictor says:

      I’m always just stunned that this concept – that wealthy people work harder than poor or middle class people — remains in the public consciousness. It’s like a virus of ignorance, stupidity and arrogance that won’t ever die.

      Sir, your delusions are monumental and fatal. If anything, lower and middle class people in general work harder than their wealthy counterparts. They hold more than one job, work longer hours for less pay, attend worse schools, are born with fewer options and privileges, and have less access to medical care.

      Yet, they pay taxes, often at a higher rate than the wealthiest, and without the capacity to hide their wealth in offshore accounts.

      But please, continue enjoying your delusions.

      • No ma’am. You`are the one suffering froma massive dose of Obamaton Mania. Anyone who cannot see that The Chosen One is pitting the classes against each other is obviously brain dead. Either that or under the spell of Obama majic potions.

        America will suffer from this class war while Obama get’s what he wants. He will keep us fighting each other to acheive his traitorous agenda. I say traitorous because that is exactly what he is. He could care less about the citizens of the United States. He is busy setting up for his global aganda of Transnationalism.

        People like you who fall for this garbage make me wonder if we will ever survive until 2010, much less 2012.

        • Vinnster says:

          lindavictor,

          Obvioulsy you have never been around both groups of people very much. I have. I was poor, but I work two jobs or mutilple part-time jobs for 40 years. Started my first job at 12 for 50 cents an hour and in all those jobs in all those years the majority of my co-wprkers are the poor you falsely claim to know.

          With the exception of a very small percentage that truly have afflictions beyond their control most poor people are poor because of their behavior and bad choices. This is what Liberals seem to somehow fail to see.

          As I have said before, and it is true, you take 100 people at random, 50 rich, 50 poor. Take everything they have from them and give them each a million bucks. Come back in five years, the poor will be poor again and the rich will have prospered.

          Being poor, particularly in America, is the result of behavior such as abusing drugs, alcohol, having children before they can afford them, committing crimes which land them in jail and dropping out of school. All of those behaviors are a choice, no one forces them to behave that way. And please don’t give me the “you don’t understand their pressures” crap. You want to really know pressure go talk to you typical wealthy person (which the vast majority archived their wealth the old fashioned way–THEY EARN IT)!

          If there was ever a better proof of Liberals living in LALA Land is their drivel about the poor working just as hard as wealthy people. How does it square with that line of crap when an immigrant can come to America with nothing and barely understand the language and in two decades have a small business and be prosperous? Do you think they did it by working a single 40 hour a week job? No, they worked much harder and they made sacrifices of doing without and living below their means.

          So lindavictor, honey, you peddle that fantasy Liberal mantra to other Liberal idiots, so you can rationalize why it is OK to take wealth from very hard working people, that sacrifice for decades to become prosperous, and give it to people who habitually make bad choices and squander what they do earn.

          America is still the greatest place in the world to start with nothing and over time become wealthy. The process is teachable (not in today’s Liberal schools) and the process is repeatable by anyone willing to avoid bad choices. Unfortunately, Liberalism is the great enabler of poor choices.

          Look no further than the African America (AA) community. They have been in the complete control and influence of the Liberal culture since the late 60s. Conservatism/Libertarianism has zero, zip, nada influence in that group. Look at where they are today in comparison to how their culture was in the late 60s.

          In the late 60s their “cultural statistics”(married [father stays with family], out-of-wedlock births, dropout rates, crime) where not that different from non-AA cultures, but then Liberals came to the rescue to “help” them and look what you have to done to their situation. If the KKK in the 60s had set out to secretly destroy the AA community they could not have come up with a better method than what Liberalism has done to them.

          Liberalism is the great enabler of behavior that consistently produces poor people.

          If our Liberal schools, staring in the first grade, taught the opposite of what is currently taught poverty would almost be eliminated.

          So, lindavictor, honey, while you being the typical Liberal, blame everyone else for the plight of poor, look no further than a mirror…the poor in America are the product of your belief system, and they are making choices based on what Liberalism has taught them…it is someone elses’ fault and I do not control my destiny or my own behavior.

          • Vinnster, I was going to save the energy by not responding to Linda, but you have stated very clearly my thoughts perfectly. Thank you.

            • Vinnster says:

              Thanks Kathy,

              Sometimes when someone is “stuck on stupid”, I can’t hold back. Hope you had a great 4th.

          • Cyndi P says:

            Well said Vinster. More Liberals should read your words.

          • Awsome job, Vinnster. I think it would also help to point out that Liberalism enables the poor to remain poor because liberalism thrives off a dependancy class to rely on the government. It only makes sense to the liberals that if they want to grow government, make people more dependant on them. You can apply that mentality to practically everything they try to pass.

        • Eso, I agree with all you said; but that leads me again to a question that keeps popping up in my head: WHY does O-boy want to be controlling, pit the classes, create diverstity worse than it is now, and make all/most citizens downtrodden? Why does he want all people to live and be the same in this Utopian hallucigen in his head? I don’t get the outcome. Eventually, everyone will no that he is the worst mistake this country ever made. So what is his point?

          • dmp,

            I’ve asked that question here, and to others. The answer hasn’t really been given. I think most folks believe that Obama really has our best interest at heart. To believe otherewise is very frightening. They just plain don’t want to go there. Personally, I believe Obama’s objective in the short term is to become another Hugo Chavez type ruler. The long term is to surrender US sovreignity to the UN or even the global Caliphate. There. I said it. Now everyone thinks I’m nuts. But why else would Obama be grabbing all this power? What does he plan to do with it? The results of his grabs don’t appear to be making the existance of the great unwashed masses any easier. Most of us unwashed can’t even explain how it might.

      • Folks….do not let someone like this even bother you. Worse than drive by media and she did exactly what she set out to do…. stir the blood. She/he is a drive by. Ignore it. No one is this stupid on purpose.

        • Murphy's Law says:

          I could not agree more with all of you who have answered Lindavictim……she is a Koolaid drinker of the worst kind.

          I come from a solid middle class background but have worked in wealthy communities and in poverty level communities……and people choose to stay in poverty- I have seen it for years. I have also seen those who chose to get out, and sucking on the government teat programs did not get them out. But no need to take my word for it- if you want to read a really great book on the subject, it is A Framework for Understanding Poverty by Ruby K. Payne, Ph.D. It is available at Amazon.com in paperback for about $15 or so, (maybe also the local library) and though the title sounds dry, I couldn’t put it down once I started reading it. I was a teacher in a poverty level school when I was ordered by my principal to read it…..I couldn’t understand why, when nice clothes or bicycles, etc. were given to my students through Christmas adopt-a-student programs, those clothes were worn maybe once and never seen again…….and when we would ask how they were enjoying the bike they told us that their parents had sold it……not for food or rent, but so they could go to a bingo parlor or to the state fair and spend $200 on a day of entertainment. These parents couldn’t (oh, wait- they WOULDN’T) buy school supplies, but we sure heard about the new big screen TV just purchased. Dr. Payne’s book explained it all beginning with 7 “scenarios” she tells and then asks the reader to predict what will happen next, and why……I gained a whole new understanding of my own middle class behavior, as well as the behavior of the wealty, because she had observed it all and had amazing insight about it all. This next paragraph is from her introduction:

          “I was married more than 30 years to Frank, who grew up in poverty because his father died when he was 6. Though it was situational poverty, he lived for several years with those who were in generational poverty. Over the years, as I met his family and the many other player in the “neighborhood,” I came to realize there were major differences between generational poverty and middle class- and that the biggest differences were not about money. But what put the whole picture into bas-relief were the six years we spent in Illinois among the wealthy. It was the addition of the third dimension, wealth, that clarified the differences between and among poverty, middle class, and wealth.”

          After the first few chapters, the book gets more and more into how to deal with students living in generational poverty, so just read until it no longer interests you…..but I promise the first chapters will have you riveted. Everyone to whom I’ve loaned the book, whether in education or not, has marveled at how it explains the many people they know in the different classes, including themselves.

          Lindavictim……I would love for you to read it……but my bet is you want to continue enjoying YOUR delusions.

  3. Happy Independence Day to all!! How come I feel we will have two of these holidays soon? Seems that the only people who want this healthcare mess are the ones who can’t or won’t provide for themselves. We the people need to stand up and say “HELL NO” to this legislation and the “cap and Trade” crap.

    I’ve learned to look for clues about what could be coming my way, and yesterday I think I may have heard a big one. Here’s an interesting storyfor you to think about: A coworker applied for a two year student loan for his son, who will start his third year at Ohio State. Key Bank, will no longer do student loans, so the parents went to their bank (Chase) and applied. Now this couple has far more money in the bank than they were asking for, and have credit ratings in the middle 800’s, and yet they were DENIED! It was a two year loan request, clue #1.

    As a big NFL fan, it is very possible that the 2011 season may not happen. The QB for the Philly Eagles was given a nice pay raise a month or so back, but not the normal contract extension that most star players get. His contract will expire after the 2010 season. Clue #2.

    I can write for quite awhile on these little, unrelated clues. These are just some small examples. My gut tells me we are in for a big problem within the next two years, not sure what, economic collapse?, Civil war?, maybe both! All these big issues we discuss here are part of the bigger picture, pieces of a puzzle, that is being put together under our very noses. I wonder if it isn’t already too late to stop it, but soon enough to prepare for it! I hope I’m so wrong about the future, but my gut don’t lead me wrong.

    Welcome to the beginning of the second American Revolution!

    G!

  4. Danak13 says:

    Well, well, well….Are there any vets out there that have received their letter from the VA yet? I got my letter yesterday, informing me that under the new proposal from the Obama administration and Congress, that my VA benefits are now going to be evaluated and taxed as income. In addition, this same letter said that it will be mandated that all veterans will need to secure supplemental health coverage in addition to the VA benefits received and failure to secure supplemental income could mean forfeiture of current VA medical benefits.

    I am sure that BF and Ray will find this acceptable.

    D13

    • D13, I’m a vet, but haven’t received anything, but I’m not in the VA healthcare system at this time. My Dad, also a vet, is in the system, on O2 24/7, but hasn’t said anything yet. Of course the mail gets to where he lives alot slower, so it could be a few days.

      What a mess were in!

      G!

      • Danak13 says:

        Yes, I am in the VA System because of two things…Agent Orange Herbicide poisoning, that I am told will no longer be considered a medical necessity because less than 1% of the VA population now has it. (Welcome to managed health care), and wounds received in Vietnam as well as a diluted form of PTSD (which I feel that I am handling just fine).

        A/O turns into cancer and diabetes but, so far, I have no symptoms of either because the area that I was in did not receive really heavy doses of the nasty stuff. Did kill the foliage though and the little buggers could not hide as well. Saved lives in the short run but is costing lives in the long run. Even though I am considered high risk for cancer and diabetes, preventative care is now being disallowed because I am now in the < 1%. So, until I actually come down with it, I have no coverage.

        Therefore, I will assume that managed health care is going to be reactive and not proactive and based on percentages and age.

        D13

        • Judy S. says:

          Hi D13

          A friend of ours also has Agent Orange from being n Viet Nam, plus he was shot in the foot when he was a gunner on helicopters there. Had half his heel shot off and has been having problems since. He was a long haul truck driver for about 25 or 30 years, had to quit because of major back and foot problems. He’s been going to the VA for quite a few years because of his problem. He said when he first started going there, if took forever to see a doctor, but now, they seemed to have changed, and it doesn’t take too long to see one now. He has to take all kinds of medication because of the massive pain he has, constant headaches, feeling sick a lot, sometimes feeling pretty week, and other times feeling pretty good. We last saw him about a month ago, and he didn’t look too good. Said he was feeling a little queesy, but he thinks it’s the medication he’s on. He never did say what it is he’s taking. He said he feels like he’s not going to be around too much longer, maybe about another 2 or 3 years, so he’s trying to get everything in order now. He’s lost a lot of weight and looks about 20 years older than I do, and we’re both the same age, 57. Thought I’d mention that since you did.

          My Regards
          Judy

        • My Daddy has not recieved a letter yet either. He has been diagnosed with AO poisoning several years ago. He is 100% Service Connected Disability. How much do you think this will affect him?

          I AM NOT ONLY GETTING A SICK FEELING IN MY STOMACH, I AM ALSO STARTING TO GET REALLY PISSED OFF.

          I was feeling very good today too after my Tea Party I attended. I would say something very nasty right now but I am trying my best to be good on USW’s site.

          But I hope when Obama gets home his mama runs out from under the porch and bites him on the leg. 😈

      • Judy S. says:

        Good morning guys

        My husband and son are both vets, and haven’t received any letter yet. In fact, my husband has been going to the VA for some routine tests lately, and hasn’t had any problems with them so far. He said he couldn’t have been treated better. But this concoction of Obama’s is just plain ridiculous of you ask me, making them get supplemental insurance. I guess Tri-Care isn’t good enough anymore? What ever happened to America taking care of it’s vets? What if you can’t afford a supplemental insurance, then what? And just how are they going to force every American to get heath coverage, go around door to door and ask you if you have any health insurance? If you don’t, what are they going to do, make you cough up $1000 right then and there? So, he’s going to make health insurance mandatory, whether you want it or not or need it. I am so sick of this president and his arrogant way, and what he’s doing, I can just scream.

        • Danak13 says:

          No no…it will be like car insurance…when you go to the hospital and you do not have health insurance, there will be a form filled out and a fine added to your bill to be turned into the government upon collection….that is how the bill reads.

        • Danak13 says:

          I am not meaning to imply that I am not getting good treatment…I can get into the doctors…no problem. It is getting ready to change.

      • D13, Hope all goes well for you with the medical issues. What you are dealing with as far as the VA goes is going to be the norm for everyone, and probably worse.

        Judy, the screamin part is, like with myself, a feeling of helplessness. When the screaming turns to shooting, I might feel better LOL. Hope your Holiday is a good one!

        G!

        • Judy S. says:

          Morning G-Man

          Exactly, I’m with you on that. I don’t like the feeling of having my life dictated and how it’s suppose to be. I’m my own boss, and I’ll be damned if I want somebody, don’t care who it is, telling me what I can and can’t do. As for the Holiday, no plans really, just staying home. Going out with my son later today to Truckee and Blairsden Ca. to pick up a couple water sample then stopping to have lunch somewhere. It’s a me day to do what I want, and to be able to take break from taking care of my mother for a few hours. My husband will be here for her in case she needs anything.

          Hope your Holiday will be a good one also.

          Judy

    • Black Flag says:

      Why would I think this is acceptable?

      • I may be wrong, but D13 might have meant Chris D. I highly doubt you would find this anywhere near acceptable.

      • BF…My mistake….I am guilty of a bad filing system…I did not mean you at all…please..I apologize.

  5. I have somewhat mixed emotions about this. I have NEVER seen the government run ANYTHING correctly, so this idea that there gonna step in and “solve” healthcare scares me to no end! At the same time, due to the fun times I’ve had trying to provide insurance for my family, something has got to be fixed! I know that insurance companies are in it for profit, and I do not begrudge them that, but really, does it REALLY cost that much more for an individual plan vs. a group plan?! My wife has what they call a pre-existing condition, and what very limited coverages I have found so far either won’t take her(even without any relapses in over 10 years), or offer VERY low coverage(imagine having a 40k hospital stay, and your insurance co. says” we’ll pay 2500″!), or will provide said crappy coverage and charge me only an arm, a leg and my left testicle! Do they really want to force everyone to have a “job” that has a group plan? What if you want more out of your life than a job? What if you want to just imrove your future, and others futures, and do it without a job? They just want to take away all choices, and tell you how to live your life! Since my wife is about to lose her insurance at work( since they keep raising the hours requirements and cutting hours at her co.), I am now faced with the unenviable task of once again, attempting to take care of and provide for my family, by trying to find insurance that won’t put me in the poorhouse to pay for it!!!

    • Matt, there are many parts of our healthcare system that needs fixed, and insurance is the second biggest. The first being a$$hole doctors. IMHO, any govt control will be a death sentence to many people, as the only way to cut cost is by denying care, especially for the elderly. Remember not long ago, O’dipshit said “surgery or a pain pill, you get the pill”. I feel for you and your family under your situation, but Govt control is NOT the answer.

      G!

      • G-Man- I totally agree with you! Even with all my issues with insurance companies, NO WAY, NO HOW do I want the government coming ANYWHERE near controlling health insurance. I really think our government is the one that wants to control our lives and decisions, not the insurance companies! They only want to make money, not tell me how to live my life!

    • Matt,

      Sorry for your situation, wish I had good advice to give. Have you looked at religious based hospitals? Many of them offer assistance based on need and ability to pay. Baptist in our area usually finds a way to help those who need it, and you don’t have to go to church.

      I think a lot of the problems are where the government has regulated, stopping free market driven responses. I think about 30% of hospital users pay nothing, which means those cost are passed on to the rest of us. Add to that all the cost of malpractice insurance, since they will not put any limits on tort. Something does need to be done, tort reform would be the quickest and easiest. Except all the lawyers in congress will continue looking out for their selves.

      • L.O.I- thanks for the input- I haven’t explored that avenue yet. Agree with you, our government tends to over-regulate, causing costs to rise. Add to this the welfare cases, the homeless cases, the illegal alien cases and the tort issues, it all adds up to insurance companies saying”we’ll just scr*w the man who doesn’t slave away at an employer and make up some of those losses with him”! The battle in my case will rage on! Anyway, I’m off to do my daily gig, on my schedule not anyone elses, so I can make some more $$$ to afford this impending change!! Happy Independence Day to all!!!

    • Alan F. says:

      There’s the rub here. Those who can’t afford what’s available have no where else to go and that’s why Canadians took it upon themselves to carry that specific burden squarely through our massive taxes. There are some things a conservative type can suck it up on and health care is one of them but it can’t be done on top of president Obama’s other attempts at pandering to the ultra left. That he shouldn’t be stupid enough to believe otherwise hasn’t escaped those countries whose economies are tied to America.

      What’s not being spoken of though and of great alarm I would think on the health care issue is who is in charge of this new “health care” system. I would challenge those on the left to show any instance of the Democrats having themselves shown the tiniest inkling of the restraint necessary to “spend wisely”? Anything at all??? Just one would suffice but it should clearly show an ability to get the biggest bang for the buck without having to resort to two sets of books. Anything??? Do I hear crickets?

      Also, president Obama can get draconian as he wants with things but there’s another who will not listen and in fact can’t be bullied by the American machine, the Chinese. All of president Obama’s great “change” has side effects and towards that it would be truly impressive if more Americans would show some measure of realization. http://www.asianews.it/index.php?l=en&art=15683&theme=6&size=A

      Side note: My holiday afforded some time for flipping through the channels on the idiot box and as a result I’m a little less mystified as to why the host of Jeopardy is Canadian. The show is about facts and every American I saw on TV would implode under the weight of presenting raw fact absent of bias on a reading of the ingredients on a cereal box… well there is Charley Rose(snicker).

      • Alan, I have very fond memories of Canada when I visited as a young boy. I hope to get back up your way to do some hunting or fishing, it’s very beautiful country!

        I see your point on healthcare, but I must digress alittle and offer a different view. Our healthcare system is not as broken as the media tends to make it out to be. Yes, health insurance is expensive, but that can be fixed without government control. First, limit welfare to one year, nationwide, and get the bums off their asses and get a job. Lower corporate taxes so companies will quit leaving so that jobs are available. Remove every on of the 11 million illegal aliens from our soil, let them reenter in a legal fashion, and absolutely no welfare or government aide to any immigrant (if you need my tax dollars, stay in your own country). Apply tariffs to imported goods that undercut our own products (see China).

        What does all this do, it puts people to work, they can afford health insurance, because it will cost less because of the increase in the numbers insured.

        Our government is totally stupid, and need to get out of my back pocket. I fought for the freedoms that are quickly slipping away, and that makes me a bit angry. I am more than willing to fight to get them back too!

        Hope your day goes well!

        G!

      • Black Flag says:

        And consider the case in Canada.

        The government pays for everything, at essentially no direct cost to the citizens.

        Result: economic exhaustion of the resource

        Consequence: Since government will not admit to the failure, nor their ability to provide service – instead of returning to a economic model, the government maintains total control, and instead begins to eliminate certain medical procedures from coverage.

        Now certain ‘discretionary’ operation or procedures ‘are not covered’.

        But this doesn’t resolve the exhaustion – because, still, the cost is near-zero for the product.

        So they eliminate ‘almost discretionary’ operations (like hip replacements – true, you can’t walk, but your still alive and not likely to die, so its a ‘discretionary’ operation)

        But this doesn’t resolve the exhaustion – because, still the cost is near-zero for the product.

        On, and on … until the Canadians will be paying for nearly every procedure PLUS paying taxes to cover their ‘free health care’.

        And, still, it won’t resolve the exhaustion – because still the cost is near-zero for the product government offers!

        • Alan F. says:

          You can get those surgeries, that you can’t at age 80 unless there’s a lull in surgeries for those younger needing the same is the truth of the matter.

          Our biggest flaws are in two areas and it is they who are crushing the system. Using anything your media has dragged up about us seeing our system as being “free” is about as accurate as your own citizens who believe the American government generates its own wealth the de facto of all American’s economic understanding. We know all too well the amount of taxation we carry upon our shoulders and where it is actually going.

          As of right now the largest congestion comes from specialized medicine. We have few specialists and those we do have control their own workload. Being contract workers, most have allotted themselves a the barest minimum for a workload. Not all are like this of course, I had an orthopedic specialist who was a godsend to this entire district before the bureaucrats chased him off for putting patients ahead of the bureaucracy, but the days of doctors and nurses rushing about caring for the sick because “they care” are long gone. Its all about the money, unionization(nursing) and cooperatives(doctors) are the tapeworms of our system and its showing in cost of care “per bed” as they would say. Yup we’ve come to the point where they think not in term of patients but beds. Keep an eye out for that one.

          Overall the heaviest raw burden on the system is in hospitals having effectively become care homes. We have a large population who are themselves semi-permanent residents of the hospitals because they can’t find a bed in a level 4 care home. Saskatchewan for a while was on its way to having the influx of seniors from Ontario, British Columbia and Alberta eclipse the number of seniors who were actual Saskatchewan residents before retirement and entering the health care system. Successive administrations have failed to address the elderly and it too shows in our soaring health care costs. That earlier governments too didn’t tax those who are now seniors accordingly only goes to show that the system does indeed work to at least the point of helping the elderly to vastly exceed what originally was thought to be their EOL. (end of life)

          I told my kids to notify me of having crossed that line into the realm of my being a burden to them so that I may better savor it.

    • Matt, I’m a small business owner in Elkhart, IN (yeah, go ahead an laugh) and I’ve found individual plans were cheaper (at least in 2008) than the group plan I provide my employees. However, as a company you can’t do that. Go figure. I agree something needs to be fixed but Washington running my health care? Oh Dear God in Heaven, please help us. Is everything going to be pre-existing? How does THAT work?

  6. Does it seem like anything is missing from the government plans?
    Like ten million illegal aliens? I suppose we will continue to pay for their health care, which will be incentive for more to come here illegally. Do they figure that into their budget?

    • A thought to ponder! If 11 million illegal immigrants are made legal, and must serve in Obama’s National Security Force to become legal, think this might be a problem?

      G!

    • Alan F. says:

      In California they’re likely to solve that problem by issuing IOU’s for medical services.

    • Fiftycal says:

      They “forgot” a few facts. You will be mandated to belong to the National Healthcare System. Once you have been assigned a doctor, you must follow his orders. Failure to follow doctors orders will be punished by removing you from the National Healthcare System. Anyone not in the National Healthcare System will be imprisoned. Anyone not paying into the National Healthcare System will be imprisoned. System participation is revoked for everyone over 75. Everyone over 75 will be imprisoned. Anyone speaking, writing or thinking improper things about the National Healthcare System will be imprisoned. The National Healthcare System is designed to bring equal treatment for all diseases, conditions and health problems. No “private” care will be allowed. Except for Members of Congress, their family, law enforcement and armed forces personnel.

      • Fiftycal, I laughed until I realized what we thought would never happen already is………

  7. Judy S. says:

    I’m curious to know what these people who voted for Obama think now, and how he’s handling things. One of my brothers in law voted for him, and when I asked him how he likes the change he voted for, all I get is laughter from him. So, I’m not exactly sure what that means, he’s keeping his mouth shut there. All I said to him was, hope you’re happy with the mess he’s made of things. He just turned and walked away. I guess they were all so mesmerized with Obama, they didn’t see what was coming. What I don’t get, is why he’s so determined to cram everything down our throats so fast, and why is Congress so willing to pass everything so fast without taking the time to read these bills first. What is the hurry on everything? Are they trying to set a record here or what? I put a lot of the blame on the younger generation who voted for him, who never voted before,voted for him because of all his sweet talk. My son said that at UNR, he asked several students there why they were voting for him, and do any of them know what he stands for on any of the issues, they said NO, that they were voting for him because he said he wanted change. Not one student my son asked could give any real reason other than change why they are voting for him. They had no idea what any of the issues were, none. My son voted for McCain, although he wasn’t too thrilled with him. He was hoping that Romney of Huckabee would still be on the ticket, those were his choices. And I think that’s why we’re in the mess we’re in, my opinion anyway.

    • Judy, when you have some time, this is quite interesting.

      http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=7886780711843120756

    • Alan F. says:

      Truth be told he’s banking on most of America’s attention span. Drown you in it now and throw you a life saver of “of sorts” in year 4. A conservative guess would be that 20% of the American voting public is “The ADHD Voter”. Short on memory, quick to over react and woefully oblivious to the sequence of events, these are the voters he’s banking on. Them and the addition of the illegals to the voting block give him and his party an enormous advantage. Should he choose to move his “security service” of illegals to a state too close for comfort vote wise, he’ll be able to reshape the vote itself.

      So when do we move Orwell’s “Nineteen Eighty-Four” to the nonfiction section?

      • I’m waiting for legislation that permits our jerk POTUS to cancel elections in times of national crisis (economic collapse anyone?)

        • Alan F. says:

          How fast can you say President for Life boys and girls?

          • Alan F. says:

            Picture president Obama in a cardigan singing “Won’t You Be My Neighbor” to the school kids starting off his daily “How Things Should Be”. Now there’s a spoof looking for a maker.

    • he wants to ram everything down our throat so fast to
      1) try to overwhelm us and
      2)he realizes he’d better do it quick while he knows congress is on his side

      And about the people who only voted for him because of “change,” well that’s exactly what he wanted. Everyone has their own idea of what change they think is good. Obama played a mental game there. He gave as few specifics as possible partially because of lack of experience, and he didn’t want to seem naive, but also, because if he doesn’t give many specifics, all the people who like him, or want to like him will automatically substitute their own idea in to fill the blank. And since it’s their own idea, of course they like it. There’s also the issue of being the first black president. I know that’s a touchy subject with all the below-the-belt race card playing that goes on, but it’s true, and can’t be ignored. That’s another reason why the democrats are screwed in the 2010 election. Many people who normally don’t vote voted simply to vote for the first black president, and since they normally don’t vote, they won’t be back in 2010, and possibly 2012.

  8. Black Flag says:

    I smirk again.

    The People fail to see the problem before their eyes, and chose to rant and attempt solve an issue that is really a ‘single-sided coin’ flip – with the People as always the loser.

    You cannot fix Health Care without eliminating all government from the picture.

    If you leave it, somewhere, in the system – you’re flipping the one-sided coin…heads they win, tails you lose.

    You can’t say “No” to Mandatory Health Insurance while saying “Yes” to using government to cover health costs of people who cannot pay.

    If you say “Yes” to government – that’s exactly what you have done.

    You’ve agreed to government intervention into health care, and guess what? That’s what they are doing – because you agreed to it.

    Until the People see this – there is no chance for any other change.

    • Good day BF, Isn’t it ironic that healthcare needs fixed, in all of governments wisdom, they are the root cause of it being broke to begin with. For them to try to fix it is rediculous, and will make it far worse.

      PEACE!

      G!

      • Alan F. says:

        G-Man, I believe the notion of government involvement and “getting things right” is similar to a Nigerian 911 letter in the scope of what’s promised and delivered.

    • Alan F. says:

      Don’t get all Charles Pierce on things BF… fun sponge!;)

  9. Black Flag says:

    So, from Dr. Gary North’s blog – with his permission to repost –

    (Highlights are mine)

    July 3, 2009

    Global warming is based 100% on junk science. The most vocal promoters are not interested in the details of physical science.

    They are interested in two things: political control over the general public and the establishment of international socialism.

    Junk Science vs. Real Science

    Over 31,000 scientists have put their reputations on the line and signed a politically incorrect petition opposing the 1997 Kyoto agreement or protocol.

    A letter from a former president of the National Academy of Sciences where he asks recipients of the petition to sign it.

    Back in the 1970’s, the bugaboo was the coming ice age, as this Time Magazine article promoted. Not to be outdone, Newsweek got on board. The article warned: “Climatologists are pessimistic that political leaders will take any positive action to compensate for the climatic change, or even to allay its effects.”

    It, too, was based on junk science. It, too, had the same solution: government control over the economy.

    The goal never changes: government management over the economy.

    The justification has changed. If the voters won’t accept control over their lives on the basis of one brand of junk science, maybe they will accept another.

    As they used to say in the Nixon Administration: “Let’s run this up the flagpole and see if anyone salutes.”

    Socialism’s Last Stand

    The global warming movement is not about global warming.

    It is about the creation of an international political control arrangement by which bureaucrats who favor socialism can gain control over the international economy.

    This strategy was stated boldly by economist Robert Heilbroner in 1990.

    Heilbroner, the multi-millionaire socialist and author of the best-selling history of economic thought, The Worldly Philosophers, wrote the manifesto for these bureaucrats. He did this in an article, “Reflections: After Communism,” published by The New Yorker (Sept. 10, 1990).

    In this article, he made an astounding admission.

    He said that Ludwig von Mises had been right in 1920 in his article, “Economic Calculation in the Socialist Commonwealth.” Mises argued that without private ownership, central planners could not know what any resource is worth to consumers. With no capital market, the planners would be flying blind.

    Heilbroner said that for 70 years, academic economists had either ignored this article or dismissed it without answering it. Then Heilbroner wrote these words: “Mises was right.”

    Heilbroner was one of these people. There is no reference to Mises in The Worldly Philosophers.

    This admission was the preliminary section of Heilbroner’s manifesto. He was cutting off all hope by socialists that there is a theoretically plausible response to Mises. The free market economy will always outproduce a socialist economy. Get used to it, he said.

    Then, in the second section, he called on his socialist peers to get behind the ecology movement.

    Here, he said, is the best political means for promoting central planning, despite its inefficiency.

    In the name of ecology, he said, socialists can get a hearing from politicians and voters.

    The article is not online. An abstract is. Here is the concluding thought of the abstract.

    The direction in which things are headed is some version of capitalism, whatever its title. In Eastern Europe, the new system is referred to as Not Socialism. Socialism may not continue as an important force now that Communism is finished. But another way of looking at socialism is as the society that must emerge if humanity is to cope with the ecological burden that economic growth is placing on the environment. From this perspective, the long vista after Communism leads through capitalism into a still unexplored world that roust [must?] be safely attained and settled before it can be named.

    Heilbroner did not care that a worldwide government-run economic planning system would not be called called socialism. He just wanted to see the system set up.

    Heilbroner’s peers got the message. That was what Kyoto was all about.

    Conclusion

    If you like poverty, inefficiency, and bureaucratic controls over the economy, and therefore control over your choices, the “climate change” movement is ideal.

    If you want to subsidize China and India, neither of which will enforce the rules laid down by unelected international bureaucrats, this movement is for you.

    If you want to pay more for less energy, there is no better way than to pass the cap and tax bill which the House has passed. It will be sent to the U.S. Senate next week.

    The rest of us should oppose it.

    • We should oppose it very loudly. This is, to me, is a death sentence to our economy, and our way of life. Hope the Obamanots are happy!

      G!

    • Hey there Black Flag,

      Recently you said that the Cap and Trade (or Tax & Pillage & Rape) bill had little chance of passing in the Senate. Is that still your opinion?

      I have seen nothing but negatives about the bill, the lies it is based on, the crooked moves in the House to pass it, and still it lives on…and on…an on. How can we kill it. HOW?!?! Same thing with health care reform….insanity!

      I know you see all government as evil, and I can’t disagree, but I am seeing Obama and Company as pure mega evil, over the top EVIL.

      • Black Flag says:

        Call your parasite in the Senate and voice your opinion – it may not help, but it won’t hurt.

        Using good ol’ Poker analogy.

        The best position in Poker is the one who gets to play last – because all the other players have to make an action before you do, and you get a better informed choice of your own action – based on that knowledge.

        The Senate is in that position.

        They can let the Congress act first. Then they get to look at the reaction.

        If the reaction is good, the Senate doesn’t get the glory, but they at least get an invitation to the after-vote party.

        If the reaction is bad, the Senate can get the glory by acting as the ‘sane, contemplative brake on excessive government’ to the cheers of the public.

        They get a party for them, exclusively; Congress gets no invitation.

        The Senate sees the uproar. They want a party.

        The bill will fail (this time).

        • “If the reaction is bad, the Senate can get the glory by acting as the ’sane, contemplative brake on excessive government’ to the cheers of the public.”

          Here’s the key – we need to make sure the reaction is bad – massive phone calling, emailing, faxing starting tomorrow to your Senators. Over and over again – every member of your household needs to call, friends, family neighbors….get the word out and flood the lines.

  10. Thought I’d post a message to all the jerks in government who want all the power and control. To do so, I have chosen words from a song called Dirty Dog by Damn Yankees released in 1992. I’m putting the words in a different context from the song, as to make a clearer message:

    chorus-

    Get down dirty dog
    You don’t know right from wrong
    I’m not one of your bitches

    Get back ya dirty dog
    been messin where you don’t belong
    STOP sniffin ’round my britches!

    I feel better now LOL!

    G!

  11. Japan’s post-bubble policies produced a “lost decade.” So why is President Obama emulating them?

    http://reason.com/news/show/133862.html

    Everything the Gov’t is doing will make the economy and the country worse in the long run and in the short term.

    We’re screwed.

    • Black Flag says:

      To answer your question, Ed.

      Yes, everyone knows that doing what the Japanese did will not work – they proved it.

      However, to NOT do what the Japanese did would admit that Keynesian economics is fatally flawed and Austrians are right.

      98% of economists have their degree and their job by stating “Keynes was right”.

      Hence, there is no other solution, but a Keynesian solution – even if it is wrong

      • Black Flag says:

        PS: This is the same decision matrix of those that think government can be ‘fixed’.

        1) They have 10,000 years of evidence that government is fatally flawed.

        2) To admit that government is fatally flawed would admit that Black Flags are right.

        3) They cannot admit Black Flags are right.

        Therefore, they continue to try to fix government – even if it is impossible.

        • Black Flag says:

          My friend, E. A. Rowe, is one of the Maximus Magnus Frater of the above decision matrix in his appeal for government reform.

      • I knew a little about Keynes but tonight decided to learn a little more.

        In Keynes’s theory, some micro-level actions of individuals and firms can lead to aggregate macroeconomic outcomes in which the economy operates below its potential output and growth. Some classical economists had believed in Say’s Law, that supply creates its own demand, so that a “general glut” would therefore be impossible. Keynes contended that aggregate demand for goods might be insufficient during economic downturns, leading to unnecessarily high unemployment and losses of potential output. Keynes argued that government policies could be used to increase aggregate demand, thus increasing economic activity and reducing unemployment and deflation.

        Keynes argued that the solution to depression was to stimulate the economy (“inducement to invest”) through some combination of two approaches: a reduction in interest rates and government investment in infrastructure. Investment by government injects income, which results in more spending in the general economy, which in turn stimulates more production and investment involving still more income and spending and so forth. The initial stimulation starts a cascade of events, whose total increase in economic activity is a multiple of the original investment.

        I didn’t really believe the gov’t had a plan of action until now. Now I am really scared.

        • I like the last paragraph especially.

          Keynesian ideas were criticized by Austrian economist and philosopher Friedrich Hayek. Hayek’s most famous work The Road to Serfdom, was written in 1944. Hayek taught at the London School of Economics from 1931 to 1950. Hayek criticized Keynesian economic policies for what he called their fundamentally collectivist approach, arguing that such theories, no matter their presumptively utilitarian intentions, require centralized planning, which Hayek argued leads to totalitarian abuses. Keynes seems to have noted this concern, since, in the foreword to the German version of the ‘The General Theory of Employment Interest and Money’, he declared that “the theory of aggregated production, which is the point of [‘The General Theory of Employment Interest and Money’], nevertheless can be much easier adapted to the conditions of a totalitarian state [eines totalen Staates] than the theory of production and distribution of a given production put forth under conditions of free competition and a large degree of laissez-faire.” [7]

          Another criticism leveled by Hayek against Keynes was that the study of the economy by the relations between aggregates is fallacious, and that recessions are caused by micro-economic factors. Hayek claimed that what starts as temporary governmental fixes usually become permanent and expanding government programs, which stifle the private sector and civil society. Keynes himself described the critique as “deeply moving”, which was quoted on the cover of the Road to Serfdom.

      • Black Flag says:

        Yes, Ed, we are living in the hell of the Keynesian experiment full-force.

        Mises is the father of the Austrian school of economics of which Hayek is among his brightest disciples.

        Mises’ book “Human Action” is in USWep’s ‘Reading List’ link.

        If anyone wishes to understand what is going on economically in the country or the world right now, both Mises, Hayak and Rothbard will tell you in their books – step to step to step – and they will warn you -explicitly- of the nightmare of consequences.

    • Black Flag says:

      And I HATE articles like that one you posted.

      Not because the information is wrong – it is because they failed to answer the question they posed in the article.

      They, too, are mesmerized by government action.

      They cannot (or dare not) actually articulate an answer, for it will break the spell they live in – even if they know they live in an illusion.

  12. Here’s some good entertainment, and one of my favorite songs.

    http://music.aol.com/video/dont-tread-on-me/damn-yankees/1362101

  13. Black Flag says:

    “Don’t bother to examine a folly — ask yourself only what it accomplishes.” – Ayn Rand

    • Cap and Trade, Healthcare reform, stimulus, TARP, amongst many come to mind as a great example of “folly”.

  14. Black Flag says:

    I ran across the ditty today – I thought of Nubian:

    —-

    As Murray Rothbard, the founder of modern libertarianism, explained:

    “Suppose we find that Congress has passed a law raising the steel tariff or imposing import quotas on steel?

    Surely only a moron will fail to realize that the tariff or quota was passed at the behest of lobbyists from the domestic steel industry, anxious to keep out efficient foreign competitors.

    No one would level a charge of “conspiracy theorist” against such a conclusion.

    But what the conspiracy theorist is doing is simply to extend his analysis to more complex measures of government: say, to public works projects, the establishment of the ICC, the creation of the Federal Reserve System, or the entry of the United States into a war?

    In each of these cases, the conspiracy theorist asks himself the question cui bono? Who benefits from this measure?

    If he finds that Measure A benefits X and Y, his next step is to investigate the hypothesis: did X and Y in fact lobby or exert pressure for the passage of Measure A? In short, did X and Y realize that they would benefit and act accordingly?

    “Far from being a paranoid or a determinist, the conspiracy analyst is a praxeologist; that is, he believes that people act purposively, that they make conscious choices to employ means in order to arrive at goals.

    Hence, if a steel tariff is passed, he assumes that the steel industry lobbied for it; if a public works project is created, he hypothesizes that it was promoted by an alliance of construction firms and unions who enjoyed public works contracts, and bureaucrats who expanded their jobs and incomes.

    It is the opponents of “conspiracy” analysis who profess to believe that all events — at least in government — are random and unplanned, and that therefore people do not engage in purposive choice and planning.”

    Of course, there are good conspiracy theorists and bad conspiracy theorists.”

    The bad ones stop with cui bono, and fail to carry out any substantive investigation into specifics. The good ones do.

    —-

    Don’t stop asking “cui bono”, Nubian – and work hard carrying out the investigations.

    • Those who may ridicule Nubian need to ask themselves some questions. Conspiracy Theories they may be, but how much truth is there?

      I’m very sure that if Obama is even doing half of what he is accused of to this nation of ours, he will be extremely happy with the rest of us all believing that it is just “Conspiracy Theories”, and that those who repeat them are looked at as wackos.

  15. Black Flag says:

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090703/ap_on_bi_ge/us_state_budgets_tax_returns

    Don’t pay your tax you go to jail.

    Government not paying refunds, you go bankrupt.

    Darn “Single faced coin”…. I wonder why the People even play the game?

  16. Black Flag says:

    http://www.thersa.org/fellowship/journal/features/features/new-rules-of-persuasion

    For most of our lives, persuading people through technology channels like radio and TV belonged to the rich and powerful. That’s changing quickly. Today, the potential to persuade is in the hands of millions. With these tools in hand, ordinary people sitting in dorm rooms and garages can compete against the biggest brands and the richest companies. The prize will go to those who can think clearly about behaviour change and iterate the fastest.

    Interesting article on the new Science of Persuasion – and its tools and methods.

    What does it mean?

    It means there is a war going on for your mind.

    There are forces out there that are actively researching technologies and methodologies that are attempting to slowly twist your mind and alter your behavior and your thinking process.

    Do not misunderstand – this is another attempt at controlling you.

    They will get better at this.

    It is vital to shrug off the illusions that are pervasive in this world – and actively and constantly work at thinking for yourself.

    You must actively teach your children to do the same.

    • Interesting how the MSM has played this game so well. While I’m not the sharpest knife in the drawer, I know far to many who can’t cut soft butter! Sad thought, but OH SO TRUE.

      G!

    • Well said, my friend, we have taught our children that and they in turn are teaching their children – pretty soon we will have an entire generation of free thinkers!

  17. richard stockton says:

    This is more insanity. These clowns in Washington are bulldozing their nasty liberal agenda through faster than we can discuss it with our friends. Write to everyone. Yell loud. Conservatives are way too conservative… Way too quiet. These senators and representatives must go in droves at every upcoming election. And the Kenyan born excuse we have in the White House must be stopped. He hates America, Hates the constitution and the flag and certainly hates Christians.
    R. Stockton

    • Rich, Welcome to the land of the “awake”. The silent majority is changing. A sleeping giant is awakening, and he’s pissed off. The Japs did it once, they learned the hard way, now it’s the power hungry elitists. Fun times ahead, glad I’m young enough to be a part of it, but old enough to be smart about it as well!

      Enjoy your Independence Day!

      G!

  18. Damn Obama and his plan for “we the people”!.
    Happy Independence Day my fellow Americans.
    I, too, am out of here for a while. Have laptop, will travel.
    I’ll try to keep tabs on the conversations here (assuming my wifi works in the UK)
    Have a great one everybody!
    Willo

  19. Judy S. says:

    Hey G, thought I’d let you know I watched most of that video. Got almost to the end, and I couldn’t take any more of. Just like everybody is saying, he’s not keeping to anything he campaigned on. He was going to undo everything Bush did, but what I got out of it, he didn’t, but instead kept with it. It reminds me of what Tubby Teddy said about Bush. Lie after lie after lie. I have to agree with what Richard Stockton said, time for all conservatives to speak up and quit being silent, time for the whole government to go if you ask me. I think that anybody who keeps voting these same people in all the time, should be sent to some remote island. I hope there is someone out there who will run against Dirty Harry, otherwise my state is screwed again, and again, and again. But enough about that wind bag, again, just wanted to let you know I watched 90% of that video.

    Hope you weekend will be a good one.

    Judy

  20. Judy S. says:

    Hey BF, anymore adventure stories like last night? On the last one, you had me laughing so hard about the militia shooting at each other, and no body seemed to mind, and in the Congo. Thanks for the laugh, I needed that. Will be looking to see if there are anymore BS ooops, I mean Bf stories.

    Judy

  21. anoninnc says:

    There has to be a way . . .

    . . . to get some of the real stories here, especially those of you with tax letters from the VA, in front of at least some MSM outlets . . . to see if “we the people” really are as dead to the obvious as it looks at the moment.

    . . . . and I do not necessarily hold much hope for “rational” thought in the senate . . . after all Kay Hagan is our new senator in nc.

    . . . my 16 year old has talked for years of medicine and oncology and pediatrics . . . honestly at this point I am not sure at all how to advise her . . . she is conservative in her outlook and I see the wheels turning . . .

    . . . many of you seem to shun religious thought, but I am truly much in prayer for our dear country . . . and pray that you will be, too.

    . . . human voices do not seem to carry much weight against the onslaught at the moment.

    Happy “Independence” Day.

    • Judy S. says:

      Anoninnc

      I agree with you about religion, and how people seemed to have shied away from it. There isn’t a day that goes by, that I don’t say my prayers, on everything. For some reason the word God seems to be a taboo subject for some, not all, but just some. As for your daughter, I would advise her to follow her heart. I don’t know if you read any of my posts here about my son who is in the National Guard Reserves right now. He is a former Marine, did 2 tours in Iraq and that has made a major change in him. When he got out a little over a year ago, his older brother talked to him about going in the Guard. At first, Matthew was reluctant, but his brother told him, if you want to go to medical school, the Guard will pay 100% of your tuition as long as you stay in. Plus, he buys his own books, but turns in a reimbursement receipt and they in turn give him back his money at the end of the semester. He spends anywhere from $500 to maybe $700 for books. His major is in Biology and is in pre-med right now, with 2 more years to go before he graduates, then goes into medical school. I don’t know how you feel about her going into the Guard, but they will pay for her schooling as long as she stays in. I wouldn’t discourage her from going for her dream if that’s what she wants to do, but instead weigh the options with her and see what she says and how she might feel about it. Matthew has been wanting to be a doctor since he was 10 years old, and to also be a Marine since he was 10. He has accomplished one goal, now he is going for his second. He already knows he wants to work in ER, so that is going to be his specialty. When he went into the Marines, he was 17, had to have our permission, so we gave it to him, He told us, if we didn’t sign the permission slip, then he would just wait until he was 18, which was just a few months own the road, so we figured, what the heck if that’s what he wants to do, then why try and stop him. He said, that was the best thing he did was to go into the Marines. But, they do not pay for schooling, otherwise he would have re-enlisted, that’s why he went into the National Guard. His brother is also in the Guard,full time, has been for almost 7 years now. Plans on staying in until he’s 40, then he can get a good retirement, hopefully. He is also going to school after work to get his real estate license to sell homes part time. Him and his brother also work part time for our lab getting samples to make extra money. Christopher, our oldest is also the ammo manager for the state of Nevada, he works in Carson City so he carries a big responsibility for the job he does. We couldn’t pay for our son to go to medical school, there’s this thing called money,and it’s pretty tight right now, so that’s why Matthew is in the Guard. Beside, all he does is his monthly drill and gets $300 to help him with his other obligations, like rent, groceries, car insurance utilities, and such. He also gets a monthly VA check , but that will run out in a little over 2 years, then he will have to get a full time job, plus go to school in order to pay his way. I’m not sure what you should and shouldn’t tell your daughter, that is your decision to make. But, do have faith in her and that she will make the right decision for herself, but be there for her, because I’m sure she will come to you for advice. Girls always seem to go their fathers for advice, maybe because they think dad’s have all the answers, I don’t know. I don’t know if this helps you or not, just going by what we did with our son. But I do wish you and your daughter all the best. And be supportive of her in her decision no matter what. We always gave our son’s 110% of our support no matter what they decided to do with their lives. I guess lucky for us, they chose to go the right way, and do something productive with their lives, and to try and do the best they can with what they were and are trying to achieve.

      God Bless you and your daughter always.

      Judy

      • anoninnc says:

        Your post is a breath of fresh air . . . thank you so very much for taking the time.

        I do encourage her to follow her dreams . . . and the non-fading vision that she has for oncology, for children, for missions . . . and I know that the way that she still involves her mom and me in her wrestling with the future is a gift. At this point, she has broadened her range of possibilities, not knowing and not wanting to narrowly define her options too quickly. I am thankful for that.

        The stories of your sons’ experiences are so American, and dare I say, so Biblical. Discern the full meaning of the longings of your heart, trust that there will be a way, work with all your mind, soul, and strength . . . and trust that the One who called you will equip you to follow . . . even when it seems imposssible.

        We will leave the miltary as an option, your inside info is very instructive. On her own, my daughter has decided that her swimming (she swims year round, 5 practices a week, 2 hours each practice, and she has state rated times that will get the attention of some Division 1 schools) will probably be the “extra” that helps her get her education, at least her undergrad. That is not near so patriotic as the military options, but seems to be the correct path for her.

        Anyway, it is unusual for me to speak that long about my family. 🙂

        I want her to follow that medicine dream as far as she can. If, as she says, she wants to be a pediatric oncologist, we will do all we can to support her in that endeavor. Three summers of volunteer work at the local research hospital have strengthened her resolve.

        But, she knows that the landscape of medicine may look totally different 10 years from now . . . you are correct, that is not a reason to give up and work at Walmart instead, but that uncertainty does weigh on thinking minds.

        In a previous post, someone made a very derogatory remark about physicians in general. I take exception to that for obvious reasons.

        Stereotype is ugly wherever you find it.

        Praying a return, an awareness, an urgency for the “common man” in America.

        Happy Fourth of July.

        • Judy S. says:

          Good morning to you.

          I take you first sentence to be a compliment, and I thank you. As for you going on about your family, I take that as the pride you have for them, and I never get tired of hearing about families, and all they do. Your daughter sounds like an extraordinary gifted girl, and I wish her nothing but the best in all she strives for. You and your wife I’m sure are extremely proud of her. When my son was talking about going into medicine, he was thinking 2 ways there. He was thinking of going into pediatrics, but he said to me, he didn’t think he could handle if something happened to them and he lost any of them. He loves children of all ages, and he said that would just tear him up if he lost a patient that was so young. I understand that very well. Then he thought of going into general medicine and said to me, no offense here mom, but if I lost an older person, it wouldn’t bother me so much, because I figure they have lived a longer life than a child. It’s not that it wouldn’t bother him, but as he said, it wouldn’t be so heart wrenching to lose an older person as it would be to lose a young child. This fall, my son will be doing his EMT training so he can get his certificate, so it will help him when he goes into medical school. He will riding along with ambulances for an 8 hour period, then he will be working in St. Mary’s Hospital in the ER for 8 hours as part of his training. I believe that is a 5 week course, not really sure. Anyway, whatever your daughter decides to do with her life, whether it be in medicine or whatever, I’m sure she will do some long hard thinking at what will be best for her. I know there are a lot of young people out there who haven’t even given any thought as to what to do with their life when they get out of school, are very undecided because of what’s going on with the world today. They probably are very confused about situations and how to handle them. I don’t recall seeing anything derogatory about physicians on an earlier post. Do you happen to remember what was said? Like I said last night, have faith in your daughter, and I’m sure she will make the right decision. Tell her for me, that she has my backing as well in whatever she seeks our to do.

          Have a good day my friend, today and always.

          Judy

  22. Judy S. says:

    To All

    I would like to wish each and every one of you a very happy and careful 4th tomorrow.

    May God Bless America and all our troops who are overseas, may they be safe.

    Proud mom of two boys in the military and they wear their uniform with pride.

    Judy Sabaini
    Reno, Nevada

    • God Bless you, Judy. I feel trapped and backed further into a corner by all the “stuff” going on these days.

      Having children in the military, on top of everything else happening, must be extremely stressful. I am humbled.

      The best to you, your kids, and all the vets here, THANK YOU all and God Bless.

      • Judy S. says:

        Dee, Thank you very much, but I have to ask, why do you feel trapped and backed further into a corner with all the stuff happening? I don’t feel as stressed as I did 5 years ago when my son was in Iraq, and fighting that Al Sadar and his regime in Najaf, not knowing from day to day if he was alive or wounded, and that went on for 3 straight weeks not hearing from him either. I have never, ever been so afraid since then. I think I can handle anything that may be thrown at me now, knowing how to deal with it. I think that time then, has made me a stronger person today.

        Hope you have a wonderful 4th today and tomorrow.

        Judy

  23. TexasChem says:

    Danak13 said:”Well, well, well….Are there any vets out there that have received their letter from the VA yet? I got my letter yesterday, informing me that under the new proposal from the Obama administration and Congress, that my VA benefits are now going to be evaluated and taxed as income. In addition, this same letter said that it will be mandated that all veterans will need to secure supplemental health coverage in addition to the VA benefits received and failure to secure supplemental income could mean forfeiture of current VA medical benefits.”

    This should enrage every single person that has served in the military.What the hell is going on with our government.How can any red blooded American even think this a way to treat our veterans?I have not read this in the news or seen it covered in the media.What the hell is going on?

  24. Good morning to all.

    I wanted to wish everyone a Happy Independence Day!!

    Hope you and your families stay safe and enjoy! God Blees all!

    G!

  25. Black Flag says:

    Judy

    Venezuela is a like car engine, pedal to the metal, wide open – but its not in gear.

    A friend was showing me the sights, and took me to the center of Caracas to their main square.

    Poor, illegal immigrant Columbians were selling trinkets on blankets.

    A militia truck pulled up on the edge of the square and out poured soldiers.

    The Columbians freaked and tried to gather their blankets and trinkets as the soldiers charged down the square, beating them.

    I was standing in the square, and my friend grabbed my collar from behind and pulled me into a store’s doorway – just as maybe-18 militiaman slammed the stock of his rifle into the face of boy no older than 10 – sending him and his blood flying across the square.

    What was odd was that behind the soldiers, those Columbians not caught put back the blankets and trinkets.

    The soldiers reached the end of the square, turned around and calmly walked through the Columbians back to their truck.

    It’s called the “Columbian tax” – the soldiers kept the goods and the money of anyone they caught – but those that got away could keep doing what they were doing.

    The soldier the crushed the boy swaggered past me with his bloody rifle across his shoulders, and I stepped into the square and starred at him – probably with quite a grimace on my face.

    He saw me and stopped and starred back at me.

    He then laughed – tossed an insult my way, and left.

    My friend then spoke up.

    “Are you stupid? Do you not understand? If he attacked you, there is no one – absolutely no one here that would help you!”

    Hmmm. I got lucky.

    • Black Flag says:

      above:
      maybe-18 YEAR OLD militaman…

    • Judy S. says:

      Afternoon BF

      How do you keep getting into all these adventures, or is this a made up story? With you BF, it’s hard to tell if it’s truth or fiction. If it is all true, then that boy is lucky to be alive, you too for that matter. Seems you find all these things happening no matter where you go. How do you do it? But, you know what? I do enjoy reading them. Keep em rolling baby, I’m ready for more.
      Hope your day is going good for you. Doing anything special or not? Will be waiting for more of your stories.

      Judy

      • Black Flag says:

        How does one live adverntues?

        By saying, enthusiastically, YES! to the Universe.

        I learned very young that our lives are both resilient and fragile.

        We can suddenly be dead because of the simplest things – and can endure some of the harshest circumstances one can imagine and live.

        I didn’t want to look back in my life and say “How boring…”

        But I’m not a risk taker.

        I don’t ride motorbikes, I don’t jump out of airplanes, I don’t bungee jump….

        I’m not looking for a ‘thrill’ – I’m am actively seeking adventures – like explorers –

        I didn’t want to go fight a war to get adventure, either.

        So, I decided I do it ‘this way’.

        So when someone said “We’re looking for someone to install some technology on oil platforms in the North Sea” – I said “Pick ME!”

        “…install computer systems in power plants in Portugal…”
        Pick ME!

        “…setup satellite earth stations in Finland…”
        Pick ME!

        “…someone to install cell towers in Congo…”
        Pick ME!

        “…lay fiber cable in the Caribbean..”
        Pick ME!

        “…build data centers in India…”
        Pick ME!

        “…build laser optic networks in Latin America…”
        Pick ME!

        etc. etc.

        And I got picked because everyone else was far more business cautious than I as well as I had built a reputation of getting the job, any job, no matter what the job, done, on time (or earlier), on budget (or better) – no matter how difficult the job became…

        Many of these ventures were risky business – some I lost a lot of money – most I made a lot of money.

        I got to meet some of the wealthiest people in the world, one or two I can call them ” a nice friend”, where I can stay at their place when I happen to be ‘in the country’.

        One owned the 5-star hotel that put me and my family in an suite room for almost a year – at $3,500/night. It was free to me, as was all the hotel’s amenities for my wife and child – I just had to pay the housekeepers when they cleaned the place for us, and did our laundry.

        At the time, I was locked in a struggle with the government owned telephone company. I was working to break their monopoly and open up the telecommunications for an island.

        I had lots of support from local business, and he (one of the wealthiest men in the world) was one of my supporters.

        He has his ‘people’ all over the island giving him ‘reports’ on the goings on – legal and illegal.

        The government unions were viciously against me, and he got word that someone had ordered an attack on my family.

        He called me up to tell me this – of course I would not be intimidated – so he offered to protect them by placing them within the hotel and its grounds (where he lived too) – which had a very strong security team – while I waged my personal war against the government.

        I won that war, but it pyrrhic – it cost me almost everything I had financially to win…but that’s another story.

        • Black Flag says:

          Oh yeah, that is where I got to meet Oprah, European royalty, Bill Gates yadayadayada
          – typically, the very high profile guests bought out the whole hotel for their visits – they wanted privacy – but since we were living there, we got to stay.

          They probably thought I was some sort of billionaire – who can afford a $3,500 a night room as a residence???

          They were all nice and pleasant – but we didn’t do dinner and drinks with any of them 😉

        • Judy S. says:

          Okay, I’m ready for another story, please you can’t quit now. So what happened next? I’m all ears. You said that’s another story, so go ahead, tell me. I guess you do seek adventures don’t you. Don’t think I would have it in me to be able to do things like that. My emotions would get in the way. I’m a very emotional person, can cry at the drop of a hat, or come out swinging. Sometimes my mouth can get me in trouble too. When I get angry you better run, because you’re not going to like what you hear. When I get sad, my tears can well up inside me, and then I let go of everything, my wall comes down. I am a very affectionate person, and when I love somebody, I love them with all my heart and soul. So, if you don’t mind, I will live these adventure through you. It’s like reading an adventure book, with something different happening in each chapter, and I can’t wait to see what happens next. Gee, my life sounds dull now compared to you.

          • Sounds to me like Black Flag’s next adventure should be writing a book. Fiction, of course to protect the guilty….lol

          • Black Flag says:

            Oh, there were a couple of times, driving to where I was living at the time, I had to stop my car and throw up – the stress and demands were so much.

            Where would you like to go for the next adventure? India? Congo? Morocco? Portugal?…

  26. Black Flag says:

    The Declaration of Independence in American
    H. L. Mencken

    [Editorial note: H.L. Mencken (1880-1956) wrote this translation in the days during and after World War I. Woodrow Wilson’s wartime central planning, which led to arrests of businessmen and other dissenters, caused him to wonder what happened to the ideals of the American Revolution. Perhaps the language of the original Declaration was too anachronistic for modern ears? He offered his own translation into American dialect.]

    (BF note: The highlights are mine …. my comments at the end)

    When things get so balled up that the people of a country have to cut loose from some other country, and go it on their own hook, without asking no permission from nobody, excepting maybe God Almighty, then they ought to let everybody know why they done it, so that everybody can see they are on the level, and not trying to put nothing over on nobody.

    All we got to say on this proposition is this: first, you and me is as good as anybody else, and maybe a damn sight better; second, nobody ain’t got no right to take away none of our rights; third, every man has got a right to live, to come and go as he pleases, and to have a good time however he likes, so long as he don’t interfere with nobody else.

    That any goverment that don’t give a man these rights ain’t worth a damn; also, people ought to choose the kind of goverment they want themselves, and nobody else ought to have no say in the matter. That whenever any goverment don’t do this, then the people have got a right to can it and put in one that will take care of their interests. Of course, that don’t mean having a revolution every day like them South American coons and yellow-bellies and Bolsheviki, or every time some job-holder does something he ain’t got no business to do.

    It is better to stand a little graft, etc., than to have revolutions all the time, like them coons and Bolsheviki, and any man that wasn’t a anarchist or one of them I. W. W.’s would say the same. But when things get so bad that a man ain’t hardly got no rights at all no more, but you might almost call him a slave, then everybody ought to get together and throw the grafters out, and put in new ones who won’t carry on so high and steal so much, and then watch them.

    This is the proposition the people of these Colonies is up against, and they have got tired of it, and won’t stand it no more. The administration of the present King, George III, has been rotten from the start, and when anybody kicked about it he always tried to get away with it by strong-arm work. Here is some of the rough stuff he has pulled:

    He vetoed bills in the Legislature that everybody was in favor of, and hardly nobody was against.

    He wouldn’t allow no law to be passed without it was first put up to him, and then he stuck it in his pocket and let on he forgot about it, and didn’t pay no attention to no kicks.

    When people went to work and gone to him and asked him to put through a law about this or that, he give them their choice: either they had to shut down the Legislature and let him pass it all by himself, or they couldn’t have it at all. He made the Legislature meet at one-horse thank-towns out in the alfalfa belt, so that hardly nobody could get there and most of the leaders would stay home and let him go to work and do things as he pleased.

    He give the Legislature the air, and sent the members home every time they stood up to him and give him a call-down.

    When a Legislature was busted up he wouldn’t allow no new one to be elected, so that there wasn’t nobody left to run things, but anybody could walk in and do whatever they pleased.

    He tried to scare people outen moving into these States, and made it so hard for a wop or one of them poor kikes to get his papers that he would rather stay home and not try it, and then, when he come in, he wouldn’t let him have no land, and so he either went home again or never come.

    He monkeyed with the courts, and didn’t hire enough judges to do the work, and so a person had to wait so long for his case to come up that he got sick of waiting, and went home, and so never got what was coming to him.

    He got the judges under his thumb by turning them out when they done anything he didn’t like, or holding up their salaries, so that they had to cough up or not get no money.

    He made a lot of new jobs, and give them to loafers that nobody knowed nothing about, and the poor people had to pay the bill, whether they wanted to or not.

    Without no war going on, he kept an army loafing around the country, no matter how much people kicked about it.

    He let the army run things to suit theirself and never paid no attention whatsoever to nobody which didn’t wear no uniform.

    He let grafters run loose, from God knows where, and give them the say in everything, and let them put over such things as the following: Making poor people board and lodge a lot of soldiers they ain’t got no use for, and don’t want to see loafing around.

    When the soldiers kill a man, framing it up so that they would get off.

    Interfering with business.

    Making us pay taxes without asking us whether we thought the things we had to pay taxes for was something that was worth paying taxes for or not.

    When a man was arrested and asked for a jury trial, not letting him have no jury trial.

    Chasing men out of the country, without being guilty of nothing, and trying them somewheres else for what they done here.

    In countries that border on us, he put in bum goverments, and then tried to spread them out, so that by and by they would take in this country too, or make our own goverment as bum as they was. He never paid no attention whatever to the Constitution, but he went to work and repealed laws that everybody was satisfied with and hardly nobody was against, and tried to fix the goverment so that he could do whatever he pleased.

    He busted up the Legislatures and let on he could do all the work better by himself. Now he washes his hands of us and even declares war on us, so we don’t owe him nothing, and whatever authority he ever had he ain’t got no more.

    He has burned down towns, shot down people like dogs, and raised hell against us out on the ocean.

    He hired whole regiments of Dutch, etc., to fight us, and told them they could have anything they wanted if they could take it away from us, and sicked these Dutch, etc., on us without paying no attention whatever to international law.

    He grabbed our own people when he found them in ships on the ocean, and shoved guns into their hands, and made them fight against us, no matter how much they didn’t want to.

    He stirred up the Indians, and give them arms ammunition, and told them to go to it, and they have killed men, women and children, and don’t care which.

    Every time he has went to work and pulled any of these things, we have went to work and put in a kick, but every time we have went to work and put in a kick he has went to work and did it again. When a man keeps on handing out such rough stuff all the time, all you can say is that he ain’t got no class and ain’t fitten to have no authority over people who have got any rights, and he ought to be kicked out.

    When we complained to the English we didn’t get no more satisfaction. Almost every day we warned them that the politicians over there was doing things to us that they didn’t have no right to do. We kept on reminding them who we were, and what we was doing here, and how we come to come here. We asked them to get us a square deal, and told them that if this thing kept on we’d have to do something about it and maybe they wouldn’t like it. But the more we talked, the more they didn’t pay no attention to us. Therefore, if they ain’t for us they must be agin us, and we are ready to give them the fight of their lives, or to shake hands when it is over.

    Therefore be it resolved, that we, the representatives of the people of the United States of America, in Congress assembled, hereby declare as follows: That the United States, which was the United Colonies in former times, is now free and independent, and ought to be; that we have throwed out the English King and don’t want to have nothing to do with him no more, and are not in England no more; and that, being as we are now free and independent, we can do anything that free and independent parties can do, especially declare war, make peace, sign treaties, go into business, etc. And we swear on the Bible on this proposition, one and all, and agree to stick to it no matter what happens, whether we win or we lose, and whether we get away with it or get the worst of it, no matter whether we lose all our property by it or even get hung for it.

    Mencken does a good job exposing the errors of the Declaration – which simply replaced one tyranny with another.

    As long as people believe that others have a right to steal and kill innocents – we will have ‘the evil’ that we have now

  27. Judy S. says:

    You know, I was sitting here at the computer thinking about today, and what it means to me. To me, it means, we have the freedom that was fought for so long ago. The freedom do what we think best for us and our families. Freedom to go where we choose to go. Freedom to listen to the music we like. Freedom to watch what we want on TV. Freedom to choose the person we plan on spending the rest of our life with, and it not being chosen for us. Freedom to believe in the religion we so choose in. Freedom to do what ever we choose to do, within reason of course. Freedom, I like the sound of that word, don’t you, Freedom. Not like in some countries, where you don’t have that privilege of freedom, but instead dictatorship. Freedom to have friendships, because without friends, I think you would be very lonely, and that’s not good. But, then I think of what’s happening to the U.S. now, and I believe that little by little, we are losing our freedom, and our right to live the life we see fit for ourselves, and how we raise our children. God only knows what’s going to happen, and he’s not talking. I’m also thinking about our troops overseas and how they’re fighting for another country, so they too may have the freedom they so desire. I only hope, that their fighting and their deaths are not for nothing. When I think about what is being said about our troops, and how the war is lost, or we can’t win militarily, it saddens me deeply to think that some ignorant people feel this way. I pray for our troops everyday and for their safe return home to their families and loved ones, who miss them so. Then I stop and think, What ever happened to Cindy Sheehan.You don’t hear about her anymore. Poor lady who lost her son, but then I think how she degraded him, by doing what she did. I know, she was a grieving mother, and she had that right to protest, but I think she went overboard with some of it. What ever happened to her? I guess this is what freedom is all about, isn’t it. The freedom to do what you decide to do for this day, or on any other day. My freedom is to live each day to the fullest, do the best I can, love my family and friends with every thing I have to give. Our freedom, nice sounding word, isn’t it? I hope we don’t lose it.

    • Black Flag says:

      You lost all your freedom a long time ago – at least since 1865 – perhaps earlier.

      Are you willing to it differently next time?

      • Judy S. says:

        How do you mean, differently next time. What I get out of that is, that it sounds like you believe reincarnation. Do you? I do, and I have a story for you that you or anybody else might not believe, if I tell it. It has to do with my oldest son Christopher, and the Civil War.

        • I would like to read it, Judy.

          • Judy S. says:

            Well,I’m sorry to do this to you, but it’s going to have to wait until later, because when my husband gets home, we’re going to be going out for a while. I hate to keep you in suspense, but just let me say this, that everything he told me, I found in books at the library. Mind you this all took place when he was between 10 and 13 years old, and it always seem to happen when he was really sick. Don’t ask me why then, but that’s when it usually happened. Maybe because his immunity was lower, not sure. But I won’t let you down, I will put it up later.

            Judy

            • Judy S. says:

              BTW, it will take me some time to put it down,because I don’t want to leave anything out.

        • Black Flag says:

          No, I mean the ‘way things are’ are going to end.

          There will be a small window of opportunity to create a new future.

          Are you ready?

          • Judy S. says:

            Am I ready for what BF, the end or the small window of opportunity for a new beginning. Just how are things going to end? Do you mean the world or of mankind? Hey, read my story and tell me what you think about it. Yes, it’s all true, I don’t make things up, especially like that.

            • Black Flag says:

              Both, you need to survive so to be able to act in the future.

              Our current paradigm of society will be tossed. It failed.

              The next paradigm has only two paths – Dark Ages and the greatest mass loss of human life in history (billions dead) OR
              the greatest explosion of human freedom and prosperity.

              Ready or not, its coming.

  28. Judy S. says:

    Okay,Dee, here we go, you ready?
    Like I said, when my son was between 10 and 13, and sick , he would have dreams that he was in the Civil War. He told me about how he was a Col., and he had a black regiment. He described what he looked like down to a T. He said that he had blond hair, blue eyes, and a funny little goat-tee, a little on the short side, maybe about 5’8″ to 5”9″. He described his house as a big white house, with big white pillars in front, and stairs down the front porch. He described how his mother looked, and his father. But for some reason, he didn’t remember he had a wife, and 3 sister’s. He remembered saying that his men needed shoes because they didn’t have any or they were all full of holes or something to that effect. He remembered being in a big building and it was raining outside, and that he wrote to his father asking him to send him his gun. He remembered that he was at a battle, and he was holding his sword in front of him and it had some blood on it. He could see those wood log fencing that they used to have, one fence in front of him, and one behind him. Turns out, one side was the confederate side, and the other was the union. That battle turned out to be Antietam. He could remember later on, that he was on a beach like place, but wasn’t sure if it was sand or grass or both. He remembered being shot, but didn’t remember if he dies or not. Turns out, that was Ft. Wagner in South Carolina. He also told me he remembered that his first name was Robert, but couldn’t remember his last name. So, after all these happenings, I went to the library to do some research to see if I could find anything at all what my son told me. Guess What? I found everything and more. His name was Col. Robert Gould Shaw from the 54th Mass, one of the first black regiments to fight in the Civil War. So, I continued on with my quest and went to Barnes and Noble Book store, where I found more books on him. Well to my surprise, I found pictures of Col. Robert Gould Shaw, and he looked exactly what my son described. So I bought the book. When I got home I was leafing through the book, when my son came in and asked what I was doing. Told him, when he suddenly said, stop, go back a page, looked at the picture and said, I know her, that was my mother, next to her picture was a mans, he said, I know him too, that’s my father. But for some reason, he couldn’t remember his wife. But there are pictures there of his 3 sister’s, and Dee, I tell you no lie, one of them looks exactly what my son, only with longer hair. They could have passed for twins. He also remembered when he was leaving for somewhere, and while backing up on his horse, he saw his mother looking out the window watching him leave and waving good-bye to him. If you’re interested in the book, it’s called the Blue Eyed Child of Fortune. It’s edited by Russell Duncan. It has letters written by him to his mother and father. I know there is more, but for the life of me, I can’t remember, probably CRS ( can’t remember shit ). He never learned that while in school, only about Gettysburg and a few other places. I remember something else now, suddenly came to me. He also remembered being in a place called Missionary Ridge, it was never mentioned in the book, so apparently it was something only he knew why he was there. Col. Robert Gould Shaw was killed on July 18th 1863 at Ft Wagner, South Carolina with 3 bullets to his chest. Christopher wasn’t taught a lot about the Civil War when he was in high school, and neither was my youngest son. So we happened to see movie call Glory, we watched, and just about everything Christopher told me, was in the movie. We never even heard of a Col. Robert Gould Shaw until he told me about his dreams, and I did research on him. That’s why I believe in reincarnation, because of what my son told me. I too had a strange thing happen to me one time and it never happened again. I was sitting on the couch with my feet propped up because I had a massive migraine headache, and I was just staring at my feet, when suddenly I was standing in front of this old town looking across the street and I was staring at a cemetery. I was wearing old clothes too. I had on a long tan skirt with a light green shirt with a black shawl wrapped around me wearing those old-fashioned bonnets. After my headache went away, so did my vision. Never had anything like that happen to me since. So, that is my story about my son and his dreams about being in the Civil War and who he was. My son even resembles Col. Shaw, has the blue eyes, hair somewhat darker, even has the same handsome look of Col. Shaw. I’m sure there is more in my brain if I can remember, but that was so long ago it seems now. So, whether you believe it or not, it actually happened. But I was there through all this. The last time if I recall anything happened was when he was 16 years old and had double pneumonia, and dammed near died. He lost 16 pounds in one week, and if he went into the wind, would have blown over. His regular doctor was too busy to see him, yea, that’s right, too busy, so we called another one, and he told me to get Christopher to him immediately so I did, and thank God, because he told me any longer and we would have lost him. But, like I said that is my story about my son, and how it came to be. Hope you enjoyed the story. Let me know hat you think about all this, I’m interested to hear any feed back from anybody.

    Judy

    • Black Flag says:

      I had vivid and chilling and recurring nightmares as a Wehrmacht solider on the Russian front.

      I have never been to Russia, but was able to describe scenes, locales and events that happened as if I’d been there (confirmed with conversations with Russian war vets).

      The most vivid was being shot in the back while retreating from a Russian attack. I felt my body and its agony and cold and paralysis as, in my dream, I died.

      …but probably, it was all my vivid imagination gluing together all the books and stories I had read about war….

      …or….

      • Judy S. says:

        Or it actually happened. Sounds like you doubt what I wrote about my son BF, or do you believe it could actually happen, that reincarnation is real? Think about your own situation in your above post. I also believe in ghosts too. Things have happened here at our house shortly after Jim’s dad died in 1995. We have his dad’s old bedroom furniture in our downstairs bedroom, guest room actually. Anyway, both my son’s went in there to get something, when they heard a voice say, Get the hell out of here, and what are you looking for, I’ll get it for you. I also saw a white streak or figure go by in a mirror we had hanging in our den, twice. Or how about this one that happened to me also. 28 years ago, I had a miscarriage in the 4th month. Absolutely devastated me. When I got home from the hospital, and was in bed one night, I Was crying my eyes out, when suddenly I felt someone rubbing my back telling me everything will be alright. No one was in the room with at the time. I told Jim about it shortly after wards, and we think it could have been his deceased mother who died in 1977. So, you see, strange things do happen to people, and I believe with all my heart that strange phenomena happen. Here is another one with the reincarnation. We used to belong to the Nevada Civil War Volunteers and did re-enactments. Anyway, one of our members recalls being in the Civil War and fighting in Gettysburg. He happen to go back there one year for one of those re-enactments and said it was like being back home, and he has never been there before. He told us about this walk they were all on, when suddenly he turned to the left instead of he right when he found this tree with initials on it, and he said everything round that area was so familiar to him, he didn’t want to leave. He got regressed by Barbara Lane in Virginia. He found out he was General Joshua Chamberlain , and if you saw the two of them in totally different pictures, side by side, you couldn’t tell who was who.So, now you tell me if reincarnation doesn’t exist.

        • Black Flag says:

          I seen many unexplained things – and I know the human mind is the powerful force in the universe. Was it something remembered that was seen in a fleeting moment? or something else?

          Many religions believe in reincarnation – including the Judeao – Christian religions.

          It is a common theme.

          If a belief in reincarnation helps one understand their lives and gives them an insight into the universe, and aids them in moral action – whether or not it is true is moot.

    • Thanks, Judy. That is fascinating! I can’t claim to have any similar story to tell you, nothing like that has happened to me or my family…except:

      My Grandpa died 3 months before my Dad was born. After my Dad grew up, some old papers were found that my Grandpa had signed, and their signatures were exactly the same…and that was easy to compare as they had the same name. Always thought that was interesting. One of my cousins saw a vision of Grandpa during a stay at Grandma’s house. He was wearing his WW1 uniform. He did not die in the war, btw.

      I’m not sure what to make of the reincarnation theory but I have heard some pretty good accounts that have been backed up with documentation, and it sure is interesting. Not sure I like the idea, to have to live over and over again, once seems enough to me:)

      • Judy S. says:

        I heard said that we live many lives and I absolutely believe it. That’s really interesting about your dad and grandpa Dee, and I think it’s really strange that your grandfather. I wonder how you explain that one. I’m a firm believer in the afterlife and ghostly sightings. I never doubted that, because there have been too many strange things that have happened in my family, especially with me and my sister.

        • Judy S. says:

          Sorry Dee, I left something out about your grandfather.What I was saying was it’s strange that he never died in WWI. Was he buried in it maybe? Just a guess here.

          • I never thought of that, Judy. Grandpa died in 1932, and Grandma in 1975. I will have to remember to ask my cousins if anyone knows if he was buried in that uniform.

  29. Judy S. says:

    BF, I’m going to answer you down here because there isn’t enough room in that little spot. But, I don’t know how to tell you this, but I’m going to come right our and say it. I don’t plan to die, ever, if I can help it anyway. I have this fear of dying, but yet I don’t, know what I mean? I almost died when I was 7 years old. I was in my aunts swimming pool, when suddenly I was floating towards the bottom. I was trying to scream, but nothing was coming out. I was in the pool with my cousin, and she was mentally retarded , and everybody else was sitting a little back but yet watching us. Anyway, she must have gotten out and I was in there all by my self, I didn’t know how to swim, in fact, to this day I still don’t.I am deathly afraid of deep water when it get up to my neck. If it wasn’t for my brother, I wouldn’t be here today. He yelled out for help, my uncle dove in, got me out, and when I woke up, there were 3 firemen above me with an oxygen mask on my face. I kind of wonder if that’s why I don’t like closed in places. I told my husband if I die first, don’t put in a box, because I’ll know it, just stand me up in the corner somewhere.Years ago, we were at Virginia City, and went through mine tour. I had to leave because it was getting to hard for me to breathe the further we went in. This is just some of the things that I have experienced in my life so far. So, if they say the world is going to end, I don’t want to know about it. If and when I die, I hope it’s fast or in my sleep, I don’t want to suffer like my dad did with cancer or the way Jim’s mom died, she died from cancer as well, and suffered until the end. Never want to see that again.

    • Black Flag says:

      I, too, float like a rock and have drowned twice (obviously, rescued in time, however).

      As far as death – pain or peaceful, I will not go quietly into the night.

      And, as a very wise man once said:

      “It is foolish to fear what is inevitable”

  30. Judy S. says:

    As much as I would love to stay up and talk about this all night, I just can’t. My eyes are having trouble looking at the letters now, everything is getting blurred, and I’m tired anyway. I sure would love to pick this up again tomorrow if we can, I love talking about this subject. Until then I must say good night, and I hope you have a pleasant night and tomorrow. Hope to see you on here then, both of you.

    Good night and sleep tight and pleasant dreams.

    Judy

  31. Cyndi P says:

    Hi Black Flag,

    I saw this and thought of what you seaid a few months back. I think one of your predictions is coming true, at least in Sweden. Have you heard of this yet?
    http://globaleconomicanalysis.blogspot.com/2009/07/sweden-cuts-deposit-rate-to-negative-25.html

    • Black Flag says:

      Not until you pointed it out, no.

      Incredible, huh? Punishing thrifty people.

      What will happen? People will take money out of the bank, and stuff it into mattresses.

      That’ll solve their economic problem, right???

      • Cyndi P says:

        I’m guessing it’ll make the problem worse for a couple of reasons….

        A few months ago you mentioned that this would hasten the collapse of our system, that it would begin somewhere and we probably wouldn’t hear about it right away, or at least until after the dominos have started to fall. So is this it? The blogger who posted this seems to think its a really bad idea and hopes it blows up in Sweden before some genius in the US decides to do it here. I get the impression that you and the blogger are of the same opinion on this. Am I right? What should we be watching for next?

  32. Judy S. says:

    Morning BF
    You asked me last night where I would like to go next on our adventure. How about Morocco. Take me there. In fact, why not go to all 3 you had listed, I’m ready for the trip.

    Judy

    • Black Flag says:

      Ah, Morocco is a love story – that may be hard to tell…

      • Judy S. says:

        Oh, go on, try. I’m in the mood for a good love story. I’m in a melancholy mood anyway.

  33. Black Flag says:

    I’m an intense A-personality guy (most of the time). If I’m not working, I’m sleeping and dreaming of work.

    I was in another classic struggle, attacking an entrenched, mercantilist crook on another Caribbean island, and the stress was over the top.

    I was bleeding money badly trying to dislodge him from his continuing pillaging of the locals. He was a force to be reckoned with and I was not doing well against his machinations.

    I brought in one of my best business strategists from my consulting company back home to help me figure out how to get past this guy.

    My director was an amazing man – cool under fire, smart, and really knew how to win influence. Anyway, he turned the tide for me. Later, he gave me one of the best compliments – he said he could work for almost anyone but he really liked working for me. He said “You never get brain freeze. No matter what sH*t, your feet, hands and brain are still going – trying to figure out the next move.”

    Another thing he was good at was separating work from play – he loved to play.

    While on the island he took dance lessons in the local style – he wanted to meet people (meaning women), and figured being a good dancer couldn’t hurt.

    One night, after I completed my typical 20 hour day, he arm-wrestled me to his dance class.

    He thought I needed a break.

    What I needed was sleep.

    I went anyway just to shut him up.

    They held the dance class at a outdoor bar. If you’ve seen my pic on USWep’s Facebook site, you know I wear a black Australian cowboy hat.

    On the islands, I was known as the “White Guy in the Black Hat”.

    I had no interest in learning to dance. As I walked into the bar, there was this amazingly stunning woman standing at one of the tables. Pure, long black hair, dark deep eyes, stunning figure in a sleek black dress.

    As I walked by, she said: “Nice hat”.

    I stopped and said “Would look better on you though” and put it on her. She modeled to her friends, and they all decided, unanimously, I was right.

    She kept the hat.

    I’m not leaving without my hat.

    So we started a conversation. She lied to me on just about everything about her. Later, I learned why.

    But in the end, I left with my hat, and I had a very nice time, but no real name or anything about her. I discarded this event into the big bin of memories.

    Every Thursday on the island, all who are anyone show up at a particular bar. This is where the real business is done and if you’re not there – you’ll never get anything.

    I’m a regular. So is my enemy. He buys me drinks and I buy him drinks – but if anyone wasn’t looking, I’m sure he would have shot me down on sight. PS: On that island, I wore a bullet-resistant vest. I’m not kidding.

    Just as I’m leaving – there she is! We pick up our conversation at about the same point we left off last time.

    The night goes into the early morning – I have to leave; I thought we were getting along rather nicely so I ask for her company at dinner for this upcoming evening.

    Her response, all most yelling, was : NO!

    I was shocked – the intensity and the No was contradicting how I thought our meeting was going along…. and then she said, softly… “Well, maybe…”

    Then she gave me her rules. I can never call her. She will call me. She will meet me, I will not pick her up….. so on and so on. Quite the list….

    I had to bring my friend to dinner, and she would bring her friend to dinner. This was not a date. (The islanders call a ‘date’, an “engagement” — This was NOT an engagement..! — she exclaimed).

    I said, Ok…gave her my card, and left.

    Heard nothing for two weeks – then out of the blue, a phone call. We will meet here at this time, don’t be late!, she barked out like a drill Sargent. Then, softly, she says “Oh, and I’m really looking forward to seeing you!”

    At the last minute on the appointed day, my director can’t make it. Oh oh…. but I go it alone and I’d try to explain it away.

    I show up 5 minutes early… and wait…and wait….and wait…
    an hour later, I’m about done and about to leave and she drives up.

    She apologizes that she was late waiting for her friend, who then canceled at the last minute. I say, my friend did the same to me.

    It’s just us two. We have dinner. I take her to some specular cliffs on the island where we watched dolphins play in the water. She was mesmerized by their play, and I was mesmerized by her.

    The dawn was rising, and she departed – I still did not have her phone number, but a mere promise she would call again.

    • Judy S. says:

      Nice story BF. She sounded like a beautiful woman. So, I’m guessing she never called. No, I haven’t seen USW face book, but I know the hat you’re talking about, because my husband has one, in brown, wore it constantly.

  34. Judy S. says:

    BF, Now tell me about India, the Congo and Portugal. I can use some good reading today. I’ll be waiting.

  35. Judy S. says:

    Hey BF, just got through watching Glory, and something I forgot to say on the subject we were talking about last night.. Every July 18th my son has a hard time sleeping if he does at all, for that was the date of Col. Shaw’s death in 1863, and he was only 26 years old. Just thought I would throw that in.

    BTW, still waiting for more of your stories. Don’t disappoint me now.

  36. of course they’re going to make it mandatory, that’s no surprise. Nationalized healthcare is just a power-grab for the libs in congress, and they realize it’s have to be mandatory for it to work, or nobody’ll accept it.

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