Tuesday Night Open Mic for November 30, 2010

Another Tuesday Night comes and that means Open Mic. Please allow me again to thank all of you for your well wishes for my family and especially for your patience over the last couple of weeks. My transition to a new career is challenging to say the least. I am learning a whole new vocabulary and a whole mess of regulatory and procedural madness. I am not out of the woods yet. I will be working both jobs, old and new, until the beginning of January. That means some long days and very few days off. Come January I will no longer work the old job and things will ease up a little bit. But the new job will still have plenty for me to learn. So my time will be limited for quite some time. I will continue to work to post here on a very regular basis. I will say that any guest commentary articles are more than welcome though! I know I have one or two to process and post but the more the merrier! I have four topics below, but there was a fifth one that I wanted to get and ran out of time to look up. I heard on the news tonight that a farmer, I think it may have been in Georgia, was fined for growing food on his own land. If someone could find that article and post it I would be very grateful (even if you just find the link I will try to jump in during the morning and put it into my format and add comments when I have a moment). I would like to have some discussion on that topic as well! As always, feel free to pull forward your discussions that you might be continuing from the last article.
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When Do States Tell Feds to Piss Off?

I was reading an article this evening about the fact that the Governors of several states getting together to ask the federal government for help financially, even if it means that we increase the national debt to do so. It got me thinking about how we have gotten to this point, and consequently what should the federal government be required to do because of it. And make no mistake, there is no single right answer, because the situation varies from state to state. It causes me to ask a few distinct questions around state and federal relationships. First, at what point should states be telling the federal government to piss off in terms of required social programs or costly legislation? At what point should the federal government be returning the favor for states that do not hold themselves fiscally responsible? And finally, when is the point that some states should be withholding help to the federal government that is passed on to states that acted fiscally irresponsible? I will explain all of these questions a little further below. But the fact is that we have found ourselves in a situation where it seems like the vast majority of states lack the ability to fiscally sustain themselves, some through reckless spending and others through forced spending from the federal government mandates.
Where Do We Draw the Line in Government Spending?

No Spades Games Allowed… Chester’s Lockdown

I know that many of you read that headline and thought, “perhaps the old Weapon has finally lost his mind.” Come to think of that some of you may have begun thinking that the first day you checked in at SUFA. Spades? Chester? Who in the hell is Chester and why do we care if he is allowed to play spades? The Chester that I am referring to is a “where”, not a “who.” Chester, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Philadelphia, is where. And Chester has some big problems at the moment. It seems that there have been four murders in Chester in the last eight days. In their panic, they have locked down the city. The Mayor declared a state of emergency for Chester, and as a result, it is now unlawful for gatherings of more than three people. A game of Spades takes four people. Thus, there will be no spades played in Chester in the immediate future. That is too much like a hate group plotting a murder, I suppose. What is going on in Chester? And what of this madness they are calling a “state of emergency, which sounds a lot like martial law to me?
Civil Rights Suspended in Pennsylvania