Racism – The Dichotomy

BY:  D13

The very first thing one has to do is to define racism. So let us start there. Webster defines racism as a belief that race is the primary determinant of human traits and capacities and that racial difference produces an inherent superiority of a particular race. Like the era of Hitler where he wanted a master race of blond haired, blue eyed behemoths. Pure blood, so to speak, and that any other race or ethnicity was not acceptable and, consequently, inferior. Many times racism and slavery are linked but history has shown that slavery and racism only share a small link. Slavery has existed since 800 BC and it was COLOR BLIND. Slavery usually was a by-product of war. History also shows that Caucasian and Asian slavery was more prevalent than black slavery prior to the 18th Century. It was not until the Europeans needed cheaper labor, that African slavery became prominent and this is when the racism began to appear. It was commonly thought among ALL PROGRESSIVE nations of the world in the 18th and 19th and 20th centuries that the native African population was considered not equal or substandard. Why? Simply because they lacked behind the rest of the world in development. Nothing more….nothing less…as it was cheap and easy labor sold into the slave trade by their own black brothers. It is often thought that the North American continent was the forerunner of slavery and racism when it was not. Over 90 percent of the slaves from Africa went to South and Central America, long before their introduction into the United States. Therefore, for the purposes of this article, slavery is only a small part of the issue of racism.
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Laying Down “The Law”

I hope today finds everyone well. Don’t forget, only 16 more shopping days to get out there and get your favorite blogger a Christmas gift! Tonight I am going to be doing something a little bit different in terms of what I offer. This doesn’t fit quite into the category of philosophy or into the category of commentary. But I think it is a good, and important read. I want to offer a bit of wisdom written many years ago, and subsequently translated from French to English. The author is Frederic Bastiat. And the piece that I am going to discuss here is a work called “The Law.” This essay by Bastiat is a brilliant dissertation on, you guessed it, the law. It is available via Amazon and many other avenues. I humbly recommend that everyone pick it up and read it, twice if necessary, until you understand it well. It is short, only 54 pages, and at last check was only $7.95 at Amazon. Such a short book to read, but one with tremendous impact on those that take the time to read it.
Why Everyone Should Read The Law